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Kennesaw State University Awards Ruth Ann Harnisch An Honorary Doctorate

Ruth Harnisch
From left: Leonard Witt, William Harnisch, Ruth Ann Harnisch, Dr. Daniel Papp

Kennesaw State University awarded an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters to Ruth Ann Harnisch, a philanthropist whose foundation has supported cutting-edge approaches to gathering and disseminating news.

The honorary doctorate ─ the 14th awarded in Kennesaw State’s 49-year history ─ was bestowed today during the university’s commencement ceremony for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Harnisch, a former journalist with more than 30 years of experience in print and broadcasting, is president of the New York-based Harnisch Foundation, which in 2009 awarded $1.5 million to establish the Center for Sustainable Journalism at Kennesaw State.

“Kennesaw State University is pleased to award this honorary doctorate to Ms. Harnisch,” said Kennesaw State President Daniel S. Papp.  “In so doing, we are recognizing the outstanding accomplishments of an exceptional person, known nationally as a philanthropist who truly has made a difference, as well as a ground-breaking journalist.”

A self-described “recovering journalist” and “donor activist,” Harnisch is a proponent of creative philanthropy that produces sustainable social change.  She founded The Harnisch Foundation in 1998.

Harnisch said she was drawn to the idea of funding the Center for Sustainable Journalism after reading blogs by Leonard Witt, Kennesaw State’s Robert D. Fowler Distinguished Chair in Communication and the center’s executive director. The center is designed to research and develop ethical and sustainable new ways to produce and distribute news.  It is home to the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange, the only national news website covering juvenile justice. In March, the center announced that it will begin publishing Youth Today, a nationally distributed print and online newspaper targeted to professionals in the youth services field.

“The honor of working with Len Witt and his team is reward enough,” said Harnisch, whose foundation supports other experiments in producing and distributing news and information, as well as collegiate journalism programs. “While I am pleased to receive the honorary doctorate, Kennesaw State’s innovative, cutting-edge experiments in new ways of delivering high-quality information are what is important and what I hope everyone will notice. The Center for Sustainable Journalism is making strides as a leader in a thoughtful conversation that is important for our nation to have about juvenile justice.”

Witt attributes the Center for Sustainable Journalism’s important work to Harnisch’s “intellectual, inspirational and financial support.”

“Thanks to her visionary work, the center can have a lasting impact on the way journalism is practiced and also on the way our most disadvantaged children are perceived,” Witt said.  “She is truly deserving of this special honor."

Harnisch started her career at the Buffalo (NY) Courier-Express and worked 17 years as a columnist for the Nashville (Tenn.) Banner.  She hosted a radio talk show on WLAC-AM and worked 15 years as a television news reporter and anchor for Nashville’s CBS affiliate.

Harnisch’s career expanded to include her interests in philanthropy and professional coaching.  A certified master coach, Harnisch was a founding funder of The Institute of Coaching at Harvard Medical School’s McLean Hospital. The institute is an outgrowth of the grant-making Foundation of Coaching, which Harnisch created with David Goldsmith in 2006 to support academic research in the coaching field.

In addition, Harnisch supports the “Ideas Worth Spreading” mission of the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) community. She is a founding funder of the TED Fellows program, which brings together world-changing achievers, and a co-founder of SupporTED, an independent program offering pro bono coaching and mentoring to the TED Fellows.

Harnisch is a member of Women Moving Millions, a philanthropic initiative of women who give at least $1 million dollars to non-profits benefiting women and girls. She also holds a Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Baruch College in New York.

Cobb Alcohol Taskforce Announces Winners of Public Service Announcement Contest

January 6, 2011 Marietta, GA – The Cobb Alcohol Taskforce in conjunction with Cobb County School’s Prevention Intervention Center sponsored a Youth Voice and Vision Public Service Announcement contest for students in grades 6 through 12, representing school/community youth groups based in Cobb County. The 31 video entries submitted were 30, 60 or 90 seconds long and provided messages addressing the problem with adults providing alcohol to minors. The contest was kicked off at the start of Red Ribbon Week in October. The public was invited to begin viewing and voting for their favorite youth video entries online at www.schooltube.com/user/sources.

The entries are in the Favorites section (click view all). The video entry with the most total views by Friday, December 10th received the viewer’s choice award. A panel of judges critiqued all contest entries for originality, creativity, communication of message, and overall appeal. The top 3 finalists and viewer’s choice will receive cash prizes early in the New Year; $300 for 1st prize, $200 for 2nd prize, $100 for 3 rd prize and $300 for viewer’s choice. Funding provided by the Cobb County Commission on Children and Youth. Winning videos will be posted on various websites and air on local broadcast TV channels, Cobb Government TV23 and CobbEd TV24.

Viewer’s choice award for the most views: Wheeler High School –Anirudh Udutha – PSA: Don’t Give Alcohol to Minors

Judged Winners: Harrison High School

1 st Place – Merrick Laughridge, Catherine Everett, Chandler McLeod – PSA: Harrison 01

2 nd Place – Lauren Stott, Hannah Smit – PSA: Harrison 05

3 rd Place – Chase Waldroup, Evan Portwood, Alex Robbins – PSA: Harrison16

About the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce - Cobb Alcohol Taskforce is an alliance of individuals and organizations which mobilizes and challenges Cobb County adults to reduce underage drinking and youth binge drinking, by advancing strategic enforcement, policy and education goals. To learn more, visit www.cobbat.org or call 770-861-5758.

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Cobb Alcohol Taskforce Announces Winners of Public Service Announcement Contest

January 6, 2011 Marietta, GA – The Cobb Alcohol Taskforce in conjunction with Cobb County School’s Prevention Intervention Center sponsored a Youth Voice and Vision Public Service Announcement contest for students in grades 6 through 12, representing school/community youth groups based in Cobb County. The 31 video entries submitted were 30, 60 or 90 seconds long and provided messages addressing the problem with adults providing alcohol to minors. The contest was kicked off at the start of Red Ribbon Week in October. The public was invited to begin viewing and voting for their favorite youth video entries online at www.schooltube.com/user/sources .

The entries are in the Favorites section (click view all). The video entry with the most total views by Friday, December 10 th received the viewer’s choice award. A panel of judges critiqued all contest entries for originality, creativity, communication of message, and overall appeal. The top 3 finalists and viewer’s choice will receive cash prizes early in the New Year; $300 for 1 st prize, $200 for 2 nd prize, $100 for 3 rd prize and $300 for viewer’s choice. Funding provided by the Cobb County Commission on Children and Youth. Winning videos will be posted on various websites and air on local broadcast TV channels, Cobb Government TV23 and CobbEd TV24.

Viewer’s choice award for the most views: Wheeler High School –Anirudh Udutha – PSA: Don’t Give Alcohol to Minors

Judged Winners: Harrison High School

1 st Place – Merrick Laughridge, Catherine Everett, Chandler McLeod – PSA: Harrison 01

2 nd Place – Lauren Stott, Hannah Smit – PSA: Harrison 05

3 rd Place – Chase Waldroup, Evan Portwood, Alex Robbins – PSA: Harrison16

About the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce - Cobb Alcohol Taskforce is an alliance of individuals and organizations which mobilizes and challenges Cobb County adults to reduce underage drinking and youth binge drinking, by advancing strategic enforcement, policy and education goals. To learn more, visit www.cobbat.org or call 770-861-5758.

Holiday Season Offers Opportunity for Families to Communicate About Drinking

December 14, 2010, Marietta, GA - The holiday season offers an excellent opportunity for parents to communicate with their children about drinking says the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce."Children who live in homes where alcohol is not the focus of holiday celebrations and get togethers may be less likely to grow up thinking that drinking is the key ingredient to having a good time," says Cathy Finck, Taskforce Coordinator. "Parents should keep in mind that children are very observant and may be more influenced by adult behavior than what parents actually tell them about drinking."

Recent research even suggests that holidays may be one environmental factor that can increase risk or confer protection from alcoholism within families. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, alcoholism may become more harmful to family functioning and more likely to be passed to the next generation if drinking interferes with such activities as dinner times, holidays, vacations and other family rituals. Conversely, researchers believe that maintenance of family rituals, even through years characterized by heavy drinking, may prevent alcoholism from being passed between generations.

And, what better time to consider federal guidelines regarding alcohol than the holiday season when drinking increases as dramatically as credit card balances in January. According to federal guidelines; no more than one drink a day for women, or two drinks for men, and no drinks for those under age 21, pregnant and/or alcoholics. They also reinforce the Surgeon General's warning that individuals who may be driving should not drink at all. The federal guidelines regarding alcohol appear in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans published in 2000 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. They define a drink as 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits; 5 ounces of table wine; or 12 ounces of beer.

Successful family holiday celebrations should offer plenty of alternatives to drinking so that adult guests will not be tempted to drink excessively and so that non-drinking guests will not feel left out. Non-alcoholic beverages, food and activities other than drinking will help to ensure a safer, more inclusive party.

# # #

About the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce – Cobb Alcohol Taskforce is an alliance of individuals and organizations which mobilizes and challenges Cobb County adults to reduce underage and youth binge drinking, by advancing strategic enforcement, policy and education goals. To learn more, visit www.cobbat.org or call 404.791.7406.

Alisa Bennett-Hart
PR Specialist
Cobb Alcohol Taskforce
pr@cobbat.org
770-861-5758 mobile
678-819-0877 fax
www.cobbat.org

Special Needs Victims and Witnesses: Free Training Seminar

The Office of the Child Advocate/Child Fatality Review is pleased to announce the following training: “Special Needs Victims and Witnesses: Best Practices in Investigations Involving Children with Autism and Other Communication Disabilities”

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Winfield Hall, 3890 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096

Course Description:

Recent data suggests that 1 in 100 children and 1 in 70 boys are currently being diagnosed with some form of autism.  Special needs children are at increased risk of abuse and there is growing concern that the child welfare and criminal justice systems are neither equipped nor trained to appropriately investigate such cases.  This course addresses the specific communication issues typical in cases involving victims and witnesses with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and other disabilities affecting communication.  Some of these typical core issues in cases involving special needs victims and witnesses include: overcoming communication issues, recognizing the significance of the disability to the case, and how best to utilize the resources available for assistance.  Case studies will be utilized to discuss approaching investigations, interactions with families of special needs children, prevention strategies, child protection issues and charging decisions. 

Our instructors:

Lori Brown:  Lori is the Director of Forensic Services for the Oconee County Sheriff’s Office.  Lori is a highly qualified forensic interviewer who has trained statewide and nationally on best practices in forensic interviews of children with disabilities.

Rachelle Carnesale, JD: Currently the acting director of the Georgia Office of the Child Advocate, Rachelle is a former child abuse prosecutor who continues to regularly consult with and train child abuse professionals at the state and national levels.

Dave Nelson, MS, LPC: A licensed counselor, Dave is the Director of The Community School in Decatur, Georgia.  Dave specializes in working with children, adolescents, and their families with a focus on developing the interactive, emotional, and learning capabilities of children.  Dave is a national expert on ASD and the issues surrounding that population.  

Who should come?  Anyone interested in the topic.  While this training was prepared with district attorneys, public defenders, law enforcement, medical professionals, and school personnel, this topic certainly affects other professions and therefore, all are welcome.  Come learn how to better investigate your cases involving this growing group of children.  Bring your questions as the speakers anticipate an interactive session with the audience.   

Please RSVP to Rachel Davidson via email: radavidson@oca.ga.gov and cc: rachelhdavidson@gmail.com or via phone: 404-656-4200 or 404-797-2608.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT INFORMATION TO FOLLOW: CLE, POST & DFCS (SPONSORED BY THE PROSECUTING ATTORNEY’S COUNCIL OF GEORGIA), MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT AND LODGING FOR TRAVELERS OVER 60 MILES. 

AGENDA:

8:30 Registration

9:00 – 12:00 Dave Nelson, MS, LPC

Beyond Rainman:

Understanding Individuals with

Autism Spectrum Disorders in the

Context of Law Society, and Crime

What are the core challenges of Autism Spectrum

Disorders?

         •  What do people with ASD “look like” and how do

                   they act?

         •  What are specific difficulties in communicating

                   with, relating to, and understanding individuals

                   with ASD?

         •  What thoughts and strategies can help when

                   working with these individuals?

         •  Specific case examples

         •  Q&A

12:00 – 1:00 Lunch & Discussion

1:00-3:00 Rachelle Carnesale & Lori Brown

Special Needs Victims and Witnesses: Best Practices in Investigations and in the Court System

What is the significance of this issue to your case?

            *Understanding family dynamics

            *Triggers

            *Red-Flags and Prevention Issues

            *Appropriate & Legally Sufficient Interviews

            *Q&A (Participants are encouraged to bring cases for discussion)

Town Hall: Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Participant Media, Seek Solutions to Education Crisis

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRLog (Press Release)Nov 28, 2010 – Media Advisory            December 2, 2010 Event       Contacts:
Mitch Leff, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, (404) 861-4769
Sarah Douglas, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, (678) 521-5289

Boys & Girls Clubs of America and Participant Media Seek Solutions to Education Crisis at WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” Town Hall Meeting: “Partnering for Change - The Role of Community in Improving Education for All Children”

National Leaders in Education, Business and Government to Screen Film Excerpts and Offer Ideas for America’s Ailing Education System

When:  Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, 10 a.m. - Noon
Where: Hill Auditorium, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree Street, NE, Atlanta, GA 30309

Visuals/Interviews
Educators, Parents, Teens, Elected Officials, Non-Profit Leaders

What:   On Thursday, December 2, Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) and Participant Media will host a Town Hall meeting featuring clips from the film WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” which explores the current state of education in the U.S. and follows five children whose dreams, hopes and untapped potential reveal all that is at stake at this critical moment.

The Town Hall Meeting, “Partnering for Change: The Role of the Community in Improving Education for All Children,” will bring parents and teens together with top local and national education, business and government leaders, to discuss solutions to the problems in the nation’s education system.

Moderator:    Bill Nigut, Southeast Regional Director, Anti-Defamation League

Panelists:    
●  Milton J. Little, President, United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta   
● Roxanne Spillett, President/CEO, BGCA
● Elida Perez-Knapp, Community Development Specialist, National PTA
● Joseph Edelin, 7th Grade Chair and Social Studies Teacher, KIPP WAYS Academy, Atlanta

The National Dropout Crisis
BGCA recently launched a new campaign dedicated to tackling the nation’s high school dropout crisis.  The goal is to help kids graduate from high school, prepared with the attitude, knowledge and confidence to achieve a great future (http://www.bgca.org/whywecare/Pages/EducationCrisis.aspx.)

WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” Social Action Campaign
The WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” social action campaign seeks to accelerate a national conversation about the crisis in public education and to help ensure that every child in America gets a great education. The campaign focuses on four key initiatives: Celebrating great teachers, ensuring world-class standards, encouraging more great schools and raising literacy rates.  Learn more at www.waitingforsuperman.com/action.

By the Numbers
•   One-third of America’s children do not graduate from high school.  For Latino and African-American males, the rate skyrockets to 50 percent.  Every 25 seconds, another teen drops out of high school.
•   Nationally, 1.3 million students in the Class of 2010 failed to graduate with a high school diploma.
•   The U.S. is the only industrialized country where young people are less likely than their parents to obtain a high school diploma.
•   $276 billion – How much Georgia’s economy would benefit from each year in crime-related savings and increased earnings if the male high school graduation rate increased only 5 percent.
•   $2.5 billion – How much money Georgia households would have in accumulated wealth if all heads of households had graduated from high school.
•   $185 billion – Cost Georgia to replace the same 15,000 teachers who do not return to the schools where they taught the following year.

About Boys & Girls Clubs of America
For more than 100 years, Boys & Girls Clubs of America (www.bgca.org) has enabled young people, especially those who need Clubs most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. Today, some 4,000 Boys & Girls Clubs serve more than 4 million young people through Club membership and community outreach. Clubs provide young people 6-18 years old with guidance-oriented character development programs conducted by trained, professional staff.

About Participant Media
Participant Media (participantmedia.com) is a Los Angeles-based global entertainment company specializing in socially-relevant documentary and narrative feature films, television, publishing and digital media. Participant exists to tell compelling, entertaining stories that bring to the forefront real issues that shape our lives.  For each of its projects, Participant creates extensive social action and advocacy programs, which provide ideas and tools to transform the impact of the media experience into individual and community action. Participant’s online Social Action Network is TakePart (takepart.com). Participant's films include The Kite Runner, Charlie Wilson's War, Darfur Now, An Inconvenient Truth, Good Night, and Good Luck, Syriana, The Visitor, The Soloist, Food, Inc., The Cove, The Crazies, Countdown to Zero, Waiting for "Superman” and Fair Game.

About WAITING FOR "SUPERMAN”
From An Inconvenient Truth director Davis Guggenheim comes WAITING FOR "SUPERMAN”, a provocative and cogent examination of the crisis of public education in the United States told through multiple interlocking stories—from a handful of students and their families whose futures hang in the balance, to the educators and reformers trying to find real and lasting solutions within a dysfunctional system. Tackling such politically radioactive topics as the power of teachers’ unions and the entrenchment of school bureaucracies, Guggenheim reveals the invisible forces that have held true education reform back for decades. The film is produced by Lesley Chilcott, with Participant Media’s Jeff Skoll and Diane Weyermann serving as executive producers. It is written by Davis Guggenheim & Billy Kimball. Released by Paramount Pictures, WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN,” is a Participant Media presentation in association with Walden Media.

Cobb Alcohol Taskforce Coordinator, Cathy Finck, Receives Prevention Pioneer Award

  

 

November 12, 2010, Marietta, GA – Cobb Alcohol Taskforce is proud to announce that Cobb Alcohol Taskforce Coordinator, Cathy Finck, was awarded the Prevention Pioneer in Georgia Award. The award was given by the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental Disabilities and Addictive Diseases at a recent 4th Annual Georgia School of Addiction Studies at a conference recently held in Savannah, Georgia.  The award was given to Finck and five of her peers in acknowledgement of their continual dedication and contributions to prevention in Georgia.   

The award ceremony included a brief recap of Cathy Finck’s career in prevention: 

Cathy Finck (left) and other Pioneer Award recipients Joe Troope and Clarise Morris.
“Cathy Finck has worked in the substance abuse field for 22 years and her experience mirrors the theme of this year’s conference…from Prevention to Treatment to Recovery. Cathy has pioneered efforts for involving Georgia families in substance abuse prevention, treatment and recovery systems and services.  Cathy has consulted with many organizations on substance abuse related issues for children and families, community mobilization and coalition building, environmental system change, strategic planning and public policy. Some of the organizations Cathy has worked with over the years are: Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Parent Resources & Information for Drug Education, Georgia Department of Human Resources, Georgia Council on Substance Abuse, Georgia Children and Youth Coordinating Council, The Council on Alcohol and Drugs, Cobb County Safe and Drug-free Schools’ Prevention Intervention Center, National Families in Action and Cobb Community Collaborative. Currently Cathy serves as Coordinator for the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce, as 2nd Vice President for the Georgia Coalition to Prevent Underage Drinking, and as a SAMSHA Consultant for the Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Substance Abuse State Infrastructure Grants.”

About the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce - Cobb Alcohol Taskforce is an alliance of individuals and organizations which mobilizes and challenges Cobb County adults to reduce underage drinking and youth binge drinking, by advancing strategic enforcement, policy and education goals. To learn more, visit www.cobbat.org or call 770-861-5758.

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Alisa Bennett-Hart
PR Specialist
Cobb Alcohol Taskforce
pr@cobbat.org
770-861-5758 mobile
678-819-0877 fax
www.cobbat.org

 

U.S. Dept of Justice & Health and Human Services Award Almost $76 Million to Enhance Adult & Juvenile Drug Treatment Courts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2010
WWW.OJP.GOV
Office of Justice Programs (OJP)
Contact: Michelle Muth Person
(202) 307-0703
U.S. DEPARTMENTS OF JUSTICE AND HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
AWARD ALMOST $76 MILLION TO ENHANCE ADULT AND JUVENILE
DRUG TREATMENT COURTS

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs' (OJP) Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and the Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) awarded nearly $76 million in Fiscal Year 2010 grants to enhance the court services, coordination, and substance abuse treatment capacity of adult and juvenile drug treatment courts. Drug courts promote treatment approaches rather than traditional incarceration for people drawn into the criminal justice system because of substance abuse related problems.

There are more than 2,200 drug court programs currently providing services to adults and juveniles across the nation. In judicially supervised settings, these specialized courts effectively integrate substance abuse treatment, mandatory drug testing, sanctions and incentives, and support services needed to recover and steer clear of further involvement with the juvenile and criminal justice system.

"We know that drug courts are central to reducing drug abuse and to keeping communities safe. These grants will help communities launch new drug courts and enhance courts where they already exist," said Laurie O. Robinson, OJP's Assistant Attorney General. "Our National Institute of Justice recently released preliminary findings from its five-year, multi-site evaluation of adult drug courts. The early analysis shows that after 6 months, and again after 18 months, drug court participants reported less drug-related and criminal activity."

"SAMHSA and DOJ are committed to building on the success of treatment drug courts by bolstering their ability to provide essential alcohol and drug treatment, recovery support, screening, assessment, case management, and program coordination services to thousands of people working to free themselves from lives of substance abuse and crime," said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde, J.D. "These efforts are critically important since more than 60 percent of all people in state and federal prisons and local jails have substance abuse problems. By effectively addressing these substance abuse problems our nation can significantly reduce crime, lessen the burden on the criminal justice system and restore countless lives."

These grants are described below.

Joint SAMHSA/BJA program to enhance adult court services, coordination and treatment-SAMHSA and BJA will provide as much as $28.5 million to 28 treatment drug courts across the country. This joint initiative allows the drug court grantees to weave together federal funding sources to create a comprehensive full range of court and offender management services, behavioral health and support services to:

  • Capitalize on existing funding and services to meet the needs of drug court administrators and treatment service providers;
  • Maintain accountability and integrity of both the SAMHSA and BJA funding streams;
  • Prevent duplication of services; and
  • Facilitate the development of innovative programmatic enhancements.

In Fiscal Year 2010, each drug court grantee will receive two separate awards totaling as much as $625,000. BJA will make a one-time award of up to $300,000 to fund the court component and SAMHSA will award $325,000 to fund the substance abuse treatment component. Thereafter, SAMHSA will make annual awards of as much as $325,000 per grantee for each of the remaining two years of the grant period.

SAMHSA grants to expand substance abuse treatment capacity for adult drug treatment courts-SAMHSA is awarding up to $14.7 million for the next three years in grants to expand and/or enhance substance abuse treatment services provided by treatment drug courts to adult defendants/offenders with substance abuse problems. It is expected that approximately $4.9 million per year will be available to fund up to 18 grants. Awardees are eligible for up to $325,000 per year for up to three years.

SAMHSA grants to expand the substance abuse treatment capacity of Juvenile Treatment Drug Courts-SAMHSA is awarding a total of up to $7.7 million in grants for three years for expanding and enhancing the substance abuse treatment capacity in eight juvenile treatment drug courts throughout the nation. The additional funding will allow the eight grantees to provide alcohol and drug treatment, recovery support services and program coordination to juvenile defendants/defenders. Awardees are eligible for up to $325,000 per year for up to three years.

Joint SAMHSA/OJJDP grants to expand the substance abuse treatment capacity of juvenile treatment drug courts-Since 2007, OJJDP and SAMHSA have partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to integrate the Reclaiming Futures model, which uses a six-step model to detect substance abuse and to provide services and support to youth, with the drug courts model. In Fiscal Year 2010, OJJDP awarded a total of more than $1.2 million to three jurisdictions (as much as $425,000 per jurisdiction). Over the four-year project period, SAMHSA is making supplemental awards of as much as $200,000 per year to each jurisdiction. The SAMHSA awards are expected to total as much as $2.4 million. OJJDP funds support the operation of the drug courts, while SAMHSA funds go toward the drug treatment component of the courts. To date, the partnership has made nine awards.

BJA grants to expand and enhance adult drug courts-BJA awarded 78 grants totaling nearly $21 million to provide for new adult drug courts and to enhance existing adult drug courts.

The actual award amounts for all of these drug court programs may vary depending on the availability of funds and the progress made by the grantees. Detailed information on the SAMHSA awardees will be available at: http://www.samhsa.gov/Grants/2010/fy2010.aspx.

Details about the Department of Justice grants are available at:http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/funding/FY2010_awards_solicitation.htm.

New Barton Center Director Appointed

 

 

BartonLogo

Barton Child Law and Policy Center Newsletter

 

Top
Dear Child Advocates, this update contains:
New Barton Center Director Appointed
Applicants Sought for 2011-2012 Robin Nash Fellowship
Placements Sought for 2011 Emory Summer Child Advocacy Program
Georgia Child Welfare Legal Academy, December 9, 2010
Student Perspective: Barton's Runaway Youth Project
 

 

  
 As many of you know, the founding Director of the Barton Child Law and Policy Center, Karen Worthington, left this fall to move closer to family and pursue an independent consulting practice.  We are grateful for Karen's many wonderful contributions over the years, and she is dearly missed.  Replacing Karen has been a difficult task, because her vision, energy, and commitment have gotten the Center to where we are today. 

After an extensive search, we are thrilled to announce that we have found an extraordinary person to lead the Barton Center through the next phase of our work.  Emory Law School has appointed Melissa Dorris Carter to serve as the next Barton Center Director.  Melissa has been closely associated with the Barton Center for years.  Her legal career as a child advocate started first with an internship through the Center's Emory Summer Child Advocacy Program, and then with two years as the Barton Post-Graduate Fellow in Law.  Since then, Melissa has had a distinguished career, including work in leadership positions in the federally funded Court Improvement Projects of both Georgia and Illinois, and in private practice as an adoption attorney.  She served for three years as Deputy Director of Georgia's Office of the Child Advocate before being appointed by Governor Perdue as the Director of that office in February of this year.  In addition to her work experience, Melissa brings to the Barton Center her credentials as a published scholar on child welfare policy; the relationships she has built working as a pro bono attorney, as a federal child welfare reviewer, and as an active member and former chair of the State Bar's Juvenile Law Committee.  Melissa will joining the Barton Center effective December 1, 2010.   

New Barton Center Director Appointed

 

 

Cobb Alcohol Taskforce Celebrates Red Ribbon Week with Youth Council Summit and PSA Contest

 
 
Alisa Bennett-Hart
PR Specialist
Cobb Alcohol Taskforce
pr@cobbat.org
770-861-5758 mobile
678-819-0877 fax
www.cobbat.org

 

COBB ALCOHOL TASKFORCE CELEBRATES RED RIBBON WEEK WITH YOUTH COUNCIL SUMMIT AND PSA CONTEST

October 22, 2010, Marietta, GA – Cobb Alcohol Taskforce recognizes Red Ribbon Week, October 23 -31, 2010, the Nation’s oldest and largest drug prevention program reaching millions of Americans during the last week of October every year. Scheduled taskforce activities are as follows:

  • Cobb Alcohol Taskforce will hold a Youth Council Summit at The Walker School on October 23, 2010. The event will be a day full of fun with interactive activities led by youth delegates of the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce Youth Council – Take It Back chapter. Youth facilitated workshops will focus on giving youth a voice that will shake up adult attitudes and beliefs about underage and youth binge drinking. Cobb County middle and high school aged youth who represent an existing school or community youth group will be in attendance.  The Youth Council will develop youth-led projects to reduce underage and youth binge drinking throughout the year and will come back together in the Spring of 2011. The media is invited to attend and cover this event.
  • The taskforce will also sponsor a Public Service Announcement Contest for Cobb area students in conjunction with Cobb County School’s Prevention Intervention Center. Submitted PSAs will showcase the artistic talent of Cobb County students and provide effective messaging addressing the problem of adults providing alcohol to minors. The contest is being kicked off on October 23 at the start of Red Ribbon Week. Contest entries must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. December 3, 2010 to be considered for voting. Voting will take place on the School Tube website during the week of December 6 -10, 2010. Winners will be announced in early 2011. Prizes are made available through a contribution from the Cobb Commission on Children and Youth. Winning PSA’s will air on local TV stations during National Alcohol Awareness Month in April 2011.

About the Cobb Alcohol Taskforce  - Cobb Alcohol Taskforce is an alliance of individuals and organizations which mobilizes and challenges Cobb County adults to reduce underage drinking and youth binge drinking, by advancing strategic enforcement, policy and education goals. To learn more, visit www.cobbat.org or call 770-861-5758.

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Attorney General Holder Unveils Defending Childhood Initiative

Department of Justice
Office of Public Affairs
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, September 23, 2010
Attorney General Holder Unveils Defending Childhood Initiative
$5.5 Million in Grants Awarded for First Phase of Initiative

WASHINGTON – Attorney General Eric Holder today officially unveiled Defending Childhood, a new Department of Justice initiative focused on addressing children’s exposure to violence. The goals of the initiative are to prevent children’s exposure to violence as victims and witnesses, mitigate the negative effects experienced by children exposed to violence, and develop knowledge about and increase awareness of this issue.

“For me, the issue of children’s exposure to violence has been both a personal and professional concern for decades. As our nation’s Attorney General and as a parent, it remains a top priority,” said Attorney General Holder. “Through renewing and refocusing our efforts to serve our nation’s most vulnerable and most distressed children we can transform the country we love for the better – one child at a time.”

A key component of the initiative is a multi-year demonstration program. Phase I includes planning grants for eight demonstration sites announced today. In Phase II, up to four communities will be selected from the initial eight to receive funding for further implementation of their plans, based on the availability of funding. This program supports the development of comprehensive community-based strategies to prevent and reduce the impact of children’s exposure to violence in their homes, schools, and communities.

The eight demonstration sites are:

  • City of Boston ($160,000)

  • City of Portland , Maine ($160,000)

  • Chippewa Cree Tribe, Mont. ($153,210)

  • City of Grand Forks , N.D. ($159,967)

  • Cuyahoga County Board of Commissioners, Ohio ($157,873)

  • Multnomah County Department of Human Services, Ore. ($159,349)

  • Rosebud Sioux Tribe, S.D. ($159,534)

  • Shelby County, Tenn. ($159,099).

Some examples of the efforts these grants will support are:

  • improving the identification, screening, assessment, and referral of children and their families to appropriate programs and services;
  • increasing access to and utilization of quality programs and services; and
  • developing new programs and services where gaps exist. The grantees will work in collaboration with other local organizations, including victim service providers, tribal non-profit organizations, and community based organizations with a documented history of effectiveness concerning children exposed to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

In addition to the demonstration program grants, the Department of Justice is committing additional funding for research, evaluation, public awareness and partnerships related to the initiative.   The other awards announced today are:

  • Action Partnerships for Professional Membership and Professional Organizations Responding to Children Exposed to and Victimized by  Violence ($1,498,932) - Office for Victims of Crime
  • Evaluation of the Attorney General’s Children Exposed to Violence Demonstration Program: Phase I ($500,000) – National Institute of Justice
  • Public Awareness and Outreach for Victims in Underserved Communities ($995,089) – Office for Victims of Crime
  • Research and Evaluation on Children Exposed to Family Violence ($1,244,869) – National Institute of Justice.

Detailed information about grants awarded in each of the above categories is available at www.justice.gov/defendingchildhood.